Gas sensing

New ABB emission monitoring solution helps the maritime industry achieve decarbonisation targets

The launch of ABB’s CEMcaptain will help shipping comply with the sulphur emission regulations that were enforced in 2020, and keep in check their CO2 footprint.

In January 2020, the low sulphur and nitrousoxide emission limits in the International Maritime Organisation regulations became effective worldwide. CEMcaptain is a powerful emissions monitoring system from ABB designed to help the maritime industry meet these new regulations and become more sustainable. Its measurement and digital capabilities increase on-board safety, provide process optimisation and substantially reduce ownership costs. By consistently achieving 98 percent and more uptime, the new system not only requires less maintenance effort but also saves time otherwise spent on handling non-compliance issues.

Designed with busy mariners and a regularly changing crew in mind, CEMcaptain is a multi-component analyzer system that continuously provides real-time data offering reliable measurement of emissions with the highest stability. Operating in even the harshest of conditions it integrates analyzer modules and sample handling components in a standalone cabinet, making installation easy.

Equipped with ABB’s renowned Uras26 non-dispersive IR gas analyzer, CEMcaptain simultaneously and continuously measures sulphur dioxide (SO2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in line with regulation requirements. Each analyzer has two separate gas paths to allow for continuous CO2/SO2 measurement of separate streams, with up to four different components per analyzer module.

“Our solutions are driving the evolution of sustainable shipping, paving the way to a zero-emission marine industry. ABB has more than 60,000 Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) installed in over 100 countries that help monitor our environment,” said Stephen Gibbons, ABB’s Head of Product Management in Continuous Gas Analyzers. “We draw on 60 years of experience in emissions monitoring to provide this support in concrete terms. CEMcaptain has been combined with innovations in on-site and remote digital services. The result is a solution that provides the industry with a digital toolbox that increases regulatory compliance and operational efficiency.”

Fast fault reporting, diagnosis and repair are achieved via the on-site and remote digital services which help operators get closer to 100 percent availability for their gas analysis instrumentation. Dynamic QR codes are integrated into the ABB CEMcaptain system display panel. All relevant diagnostic information can be collected from the analyzer via a scanned code and transferred to ABB support. This means that maritime instrumentation technicians can send real-time information to an ABB service expert to get immediate guidance on appropriate maintenance. ABB Ability™ Remote Assistance with secured connectivity direct to ABB support is also offered for real-time solutions to problems. These features reduce the costly training of changing crews as well as the number of experts required on board. They also increase on-board safety by reducing crew exposure to emissions.

CEMcaptain GAA610-M is approved by all major classification societies (DNV GL, ABS Group, Lloyds Register, Bureau Veritas, ClassNK, Korean Register).

ABB sensor onboard SpaceX rocket to detect greenhouse gas emissions

ABB and GHGSat collaborating on groundbreaking technology to detect greenhouse gas emissions

An optical sensor manufactured by ABB was deployed with the successful launch of satellite Hugo from GHGSat, the emerging leader in greenhouse gas sensing services in space.

The ABB supplied optical sensor can map methane emissions from space at a resolution that is 100 times higher than any other sensors. Whilst previously only larger regions could be surveyed, for the first time the new greater granularity now allows the identification of the source of emissions. An additional nine units are currently under manufacture at ABB to be launched by the end of 2022 ready to be on-board across the first private satellite constellation dedicated to emission measurement.

Space offers the ideal location to freely monitor emissions across jurisdictions and quantitatively report on improvements. The ABB sensors will provide valuable insights which will enable governments and industries around the world to meet their emission reduction targets and reduce the negative impact on global warming.

“We selected ABB for its ability to deliver world-class instruments while meeting the challenges of a new space company like ours.“ said Stephane Germain, CEO of GHGSat. “We strive to innovate for the needs of the future, and we’re excited to work with ABB to achieve that.”.

“ABB shares GHGSat’s goal of reducing emissions through the creation of their greenhouse gas sensing constellation. Our selection as the manufacturer for these advanced sensors demonstrates our competitiveness and strong fit with the private space sector requirements.” said Marc Corriveau, General Manager ABB Measurement & Analytics Canada.

“The space revolution is well underway and ABB with its heritage of unique space instruments and serial production of advanced measurement sensors for industrial applications is extremely well positioned to serve this emerging sector.” he continued.

GHGSat announced the constellation contract award with ABB in October 2020, with first deliveries in 2021. The unit launched by SpaceX was a single unit procured by GHGSat from ABB two years ago ahead of a selection for the constellation.

With its involvement in the Canadian SCISAT mission and the Japanese GOSAT series of satellites, ABB has been at the forefront of the field of greenhouse gas sensing from space for more than two decades. ABB optical equipment already in space cumulates more than 100 years of reliable operation. The SCISAT sensor tracks long-term subtle composition changes in the earth’s atmosphere down to parts per trillion of more than 70 molecules and pollutants since 2003. Weather agencies across the world base their predictions on ABB equipment flying onboard the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather satellites (NPP and JPSS), which saves lives by improving the timeliness and accuracy of weather forecasts for up to seven days.

ABB is also a global leader in earthbound continuous emission monitoring with over 60,000 systems installed in more than 50 countries worldwide. Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) continuously record and evaluate emission data across all industries. They provide important information for the environmental and economic operation of production facilities. The range includes the ACF5000 that accurately and reliably monitors up to 15 gas components simultaneously.

Chell Instruments welcomes 2021 after 2020 exceeds expectations

Despite an unpredictable 2020, gas measurement and control experts Chell Instruments still achieved their key goals for the year and are now planning for a successful 2021.

Nick Broadly, Chell Instruments

Though the global pandemic caused disruption, the manufacturer has continued to support a growing number of customers and provide precision instrumentation around the world.

“Coronavirus has made 2020 an unusual year! However, despite the challenges, most projects within key industries like F1, energy and even aerospace have continued unabated. I’m proud to say our team has shown exceptional resilience and gone the extra mile to support our clients with the products and expertise they need” says Chell Instrument’s Managing Director, Nick Broadley.

The world-renowned gas measurement and control experts have maintained momentum throughout the year, achieving the targets set for the business. In addition, they have launched a number of new products including an Environmental Flow Test Chamber and a mini pressure scanner with EtherCAT connectivity.

“Even with the challenges, demand looks set to continue to grow in many sectors in 2021. For example, despite the current restrictions on air travel, we’re really excited that our instrumentation is being used in a number of projects working on the electrification of aircraft propulsion” states Nick.

This month also sees Chell Instruments celebrate their first anniversary as part of the SDI Group of scientific and technology manufacturers. The group now owns more than ten companies which produce products for use in imaging, sensing and control applications.

“Being a part of SDI has given us a new thirst for growth and is helping us to invest in the future. We can pool ideas, experience and resources with our sister companies to ensure we continue developing innovative solutions for new and existing customers” Nick continues.

As Chell Instruments export products to countries around the world, they have welcomed the UK’s new trade deal with the EU. “We are pleased the Brexit deal has been agreed. As we sell to Asia and North America, as well as Europe, we have plenty of experience with the custom checks, processes and paperwork necessary. However, the deal means we can go on delivering UK technology to Europe with ease and without extra cost to the customer” concludes Nick.

Established over four decades ago, Chell Instruments produce pressure, vacuum and gas flow measurement and control solutions for use in industries including energy, pharmaceuticals, Formula 1 and aerospace.

The firm’s 2021 plans include continual development of their ultra-compact range of ‘Nano’ pressure measuring devices and a special project to deliver a self-contained mobile testing unit for a leading aircraft engine manufacturer.

To learn more about Chell Instruments visit www.chell.co.uk.

New ScioSense gas sensor achieves industry’s closest match to natural human response to impaired air quality

The new ENS160, an indoor air quality sensor launched today by ScioSense, uses sophisticated sensor fusion algorithms to produce measurement outputs which are better tuned to the natural response of human occupants than any other sensor on the market provides.

ScioSense, a manufacturer of integrated environmental and flow sensors, has implemented a new multi-element sensing architecture for its next generation of air quality sensors using four highly integrated MEMS micro-hotplates, and developed sensor fusion technology which synthesises the signals from each sensing element while compensating for the effect of humidity.

This new technology underlies an industry-best Automatic Baseline Correction function, which intelligently resets the local threshold for air quality to ensure that the ENS160 reliably detects changes to pollution levels and odours in indoor air, no matter where in the world it is located. Intelligent sensor fusion is also the key to an enhanced carbon dioxide equivalents (eCO2) score, which takes account of the range of polluting or odorous gases generated by human activity in addition to exhaled CO2.

These advanced features, unique to the ENS160, mean that its air quality indicators much more closely reflect the effect of airborne pollutants and odours on occupants of indoor space. Systems such as air purifiers, demand-controlled ventilation, cooker hoods and smart home hubs based on the ENS160 can perform more accurate monitoring of indoor air. This means that users can enjoy clean and fresh air at all times while avoiding the waste of money and energy incurred when running air-cleaning equipment unnecessarily.

The new micro-hotplates and intelligent operating controls also provide high immunity to contamination by siloxanes, ensuring a long operating lifetime in any indoor residential, commercial, professional or in-cabin automotive setting.

Dirk Enderlein, CEO at ScioSense, said: ‘When ventilation or air-cleaning equipment stops running because the air-quality monitoring system has failed to detect human body odours, or has its baseline for air quality set too high, it has a real effect on the occupants of indoor spaces. It impairs the ability of school students to focus on their lessons, it puts people at risk of long-term harm caused by pollution, and it makes our living spaces less pleasant to work or relax in. Offering a unique combination of high broadband gas sensitivity and intelligent selectivity, the ENS160 enables ventilation and air cleaning systems to be used in the right way at the right time, to improve the quality of life for people indoors.’

Three types of accurate air quality output

The multi-element technology on which the ENS160 is based is sensitive to oxidising gases such as ozone which affect the quality of indoor air, as well as to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as toluene, ethanol, methane, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide. The algorithms supplied with the ENS160 produce three measurement outputs:

  • Total VOCs (TVOC), which draws on the broad sensitivity of the ENS160 to human-generated and artificial VOCs
  • eCO2, a commonly used proxy measurement for the density of human occupation of an indoor space
  • Various air quality indexes which are compatible with international standards

The ENS160 also provides its raw gas measurements for OEMs which want to apply proprietary algorithms.

The sensor is housed in a surface-mount package which measures just 3mm x 3mm x 0.9mm, making the ENS160 the smallest fully integrated, reprogrammable air quality sensor in the market, suitable for integration into highly space-constrained designs, including in consumer products.

The ENS160 provides its measurement outputs to a host controller via a serial peripheral or I2C interface. Since all the sensor’s measurement algorithms run on-chip, there is no processing overhead on the host.

ScioSense also supplies an analogue version, the ENS145, which is based on the same micro-hotplate technology that the ENS160 uses. It is intended for distributed system designs in which a central host fully controls the measurement outputs derived from the gas sensor inputs that the ENS145 provides.

Product samples and evaluation kits will be available on request from ScioSense and authorised distributors in Q1 2021.

What is fresh air and is it really fresh?

Covid-19 is a highly contagious disease and to mitigate the spread of the virus especially indoors, the common refrain is to make sure the space is well ventilated with fresh air. But what exactly is fresh air? Fresh air is typically defined as cool, unpolluted air in natural surroundings. But as there is no agreed parametric definition of what fresh air is, how can you determine if the air indoors is really fresh?

Although the World Health Organisation (WHO) has not formally confirmed that COVID-19 is spread by airborne transmission, it is probably only a matter of time as other similar viruses such as norovirus and the flu are acknowledged to be spread in this way. In the case of COVID-19, it is believed that ventilation plays an important part in reducing transmission by dilution and removal of infected particles and droplets.

Ventilation is the intentional introduction of fresh air into a space while the stale air is removed. It is done to maintain the quality of air in that space. According to The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASGRAE), acceptable interior air quality is where there are no known harmful contaminants in harmful concentrations. But what constitutes harmful contaminants in harmful concentrations is left to individual States to define, such as the Title 14 California code of regulations, which stipulates for example maximum permissible levels of CO2 in a building.

In the UK, there are guidelines such as the Building Regulations 2010 for manufacturers, architects and engineers involved with building design and services to assist in the process of reducing poor air quality and ensuring there is enough fresh air ventilation. The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 is the primary piece of legislation covering occupational health and safety. It states that employers have a duty of care to ensure there is a safe and healthy work environment. New and revised workplace exposure limits (WELs) came into force from January 2020 under the auspices of the Health and Safety Executive EH40/2005 containing an updated list of maximum exposure limits and occupational exposure standards for specific gases as required by the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations.

However, there are currently no regulations on what constitutes ‘good quality’ indoor air. Although there have been calls on the Government to make measuring and monitoring of indoor air quality a legal requirement in commercial buildings and schools especially in urban locations, legislation has not yet been forthcoming.

The established benchmark test for indoor air quality is to assess CO2 levels. Ignoring particulate matter, VOCs and other contaminants, it is generally understood that indoor CO2 levels are a good proxy for the amount of pollutant dilution in densely occupied spaces and can therefore be used as a good indicator for fresh air.

So how do CO2 levels equate to fresh air? The amount of carbon dioxide in a building is usually related to how much fresh air is being brought into the building. In general, the higher the concentration of carbon dioxide in the building in comparison to outdoors, the lower the amount of fresh air exchange. The background level of CO2 outdoors is generally considered to be in the range of 350-450 parts per million (ppm). CO2 is a by-product of normal human activity and is removed from the body via the lungs in the exhaled air. Unless an indoor space is adequately ventilated, CO2 will naturally build up over time. CO2 levels in a well managed indoor space are generally 350- 1,000ppm. Above 1,000ppm and most people will begin to complain about the stuffy atmosphere or poor air quality. High levels of CO2 indoors are also associated with headaches, sleepiness, poor concentration, and loss of attention and in extremely high concentrations, CO2 is harmful to life due to oxygen deprivation.

CO2 sensors along with temperature and humidity sensing are often used as part of automatic ventilation control systems. But what if the building or school does not have such a sophisticated environmental control setup?

Ample natural ventilation is considered to be the best method to prevent the Sars-CoV-2 virus from spreading indoors. The amount of fresh air that needs to be supplied is a matter of conjecture, but good practice is to ensure ventilation is capable of keeping CO2 levels below 1,000 ppm or even lower. Assuming monitoring of CO2 levels is a good proxy for fresh air, CO2 sensors can be used to check if there is enough ventilation in the building and if not, to trigger a response. At its simplest, this can be as simple as setting a CO2 alarm level to prompt opening a window in the room.

Most high-performance ambient level CO2 sensors use a measurement method called Nondispersive Infrared (NDIR), where the CO2 level is determined using the Beer-Lambert law. Beer-Lambert’s law states that the loss of light intensity when it propagates in a medium is directly proportional to intensity and path length. CO2 molecules absorb infrared radiation at a wavelength of around 4.25 microns.

CO2 monitoring systems often need to be installed in locations where access to mains power is limited, or its provision is costly. The ability to be able to power the CO2 sensor for long periods of time from a battery or from energy generated using harvesting techniques is highly desirable. To reduce maintenance costs, users want the ability for the CO2 sensor to operate autonomously for many years without user intervention.

Conventional CO2 sensors use an incandescent light source. However, these mid-IR light sources consume lots of power during a lengthy warm-up phase and during operation, making them unattractive especially for retrospective installations, where there is often a lack of an easily accessible power source.

All GSS sensors use an in-house designed ultra-efficient LED light source. LEDs are much more efficient in converting electrical power into light than conventional light sources and they do not need the long warm-up times suffered by incandescent light sources. The length of time the light source is active is a significant contributor to how much power is consumed by the sensor. In a power-sensitive application, a GSS CO2 sensor is typically pulsed on and off to minimise overall power consumption.

Depending on installation requirements, a CO2 monitor can range from a simple display on the wall with a programmable alarm to sophisticated systems with wireless interfaces sending data up to the cloud.

The latest GSS sensors such as the CozIR-Blink are designed to operate in battery-powered units so they can be easily installed and deployed. They are designed to be power cycled, where the whole device is powered down after a CO2 reading has been made. A typical installation might be preprogrammed to take one reading every few minutes. Depending on the required CO2 measurement accuracy, if the sensor is configured to take a reading every minute, the power consumed by the CozIR-Blink can be as low as 26uW per reading. Whilst obviously dependent on what other electronics are in the sensor, CO2 monitors using the CozIR-Blink are often designed to last for two or more years on a single battery charge.

All GSS sensors can also be pre-programmed to run an automated background ‘reference-setting’ routine where CO2 levels are monitored over time. The reference value is the lowest concentration to which the sensor is exposed over an extended period such as a week and is typically considered to be the fresh air minimum ambient level. This scheme allows users to set an alarm threshold that is relative to a fresh air reference value, which takes account of changing outdoor ambient CO2 levels. The sensor programable alarm can easily be used to drive a “traffic light alert” indicating it is time to open the window.

Ultra-low-power sensors such as the CozIR-Blink open-up new installation possibilities in a wide range of offices, workplaces and schools. Used correctly, this type of CO2 sensor can be employed as a simple and cost-effective tool to help avoid catching the virus indoors.

Find out more: https://www.gassensing.co.uk/

Signal Group announces new senior appointment

The UK based gas analyser manufacturer Signal Group has announced the appointment of Stephane Canadas as Sales and Marketing Manager. “In recent years we have invested heavily in product development, so this is a great time for Stephane to join the company,” comments Signal MD James Clements. “In many respects, our latest products are significantly ahead of other analysers on the market, so Stephane will be focused on expanding our global distribution network and explaining the advantages of these instruments to our rapidly expanding customer base.

“As an electronics engineer with 30 years of experience in instrumentation, working in product management, projects, sales and marketing positions for world leading automation and analytical companies, Stephane has hit the ground running at Signal, and we are delighted to welcome him to the team.”

Stephane says: “With my technical background and a career spent understanding the needs of engineers, I am hugely excited by this opportunity to exploit the impressive features that Signal has designed into its products.

“The new Series IV analysers, with removable screens and the latest communications capabilities, will disrupt the gas analyser market, and the prospect of QAL 1 approval for the Signal FIDs will be of great interest to any organisation with a need to measure VOC emissions.”

Born in France, but having lived most of his life in the UK, Stephane is bilingual and is particularly looking forward to developing Signal’s international operations.

Animal Husbandry: Sensors for monitoring emissions

Stunning methods are used to cause unconsciousness in animals prior to slaughter. Ideally, stunning will leave an animal insensible to pain and distress during the slaughtering process, while causing minimal distress in itself.

Of the available stunning methods, percussive or electrical methods are the most widely used but gas stunning may also offer an effective alternative compatible with maintaining high standards of animal welfare.

Gas stunning, otherwise known as Controlled Atmosphere Stunning (CAS), offers several animal welfare advantages over other stunning techniques as it means animals do not need to be shackled, separated from herds, or placed on conveyors for slaughter. There are several different approaches to gas stunning that use several mixtures of gas to render the animals unconscious, including gases such as nitrogen, argon, and carbon dioxide. Gas mixtures can be used not just for the stunning process, but for slaughtering the animals as well, which can be combined with CAS methods.

Regardless of the types of gases used, there are strict European regulations that have been in force in 2013 about measuring and monitoring the exact concentrations used to minimise animal distress.

Controlling Carbon Dioxide Levels

While insufficient carbon dioxide concentrations may leave animals still conscious at the time of slaughter, too rapidly increasing carbon dioxide concentrations have been shown to cause distress to animals including both pigs and poultry. This means to achieve the high carbon dioxide concentrations needed to render animals unconscious, many gas stunning schemes involve several phases of changing carbon dioxide concentrations to avoid any unnecessary distress. The UK also has the Welfare of Animals (Slaughter or Killing) Regulations 1995 (WASK 95) that dictate that the carbon dioxide concentration must not exceed 30 %, and external devices must be used to measure by volume the maximum concentration with audible warning systems should concentrations deviate from the legislated limits.

While a great deal of care and attention is required for the control of gas stunning practices, when properly executed, humane stunning practices have a positive effect on final meat quality. Gas stunning methods can be very efficient as it minimises transport of livestock and herds can be stunned at a time, rather than requiring an individual operator to prepare and stun individual animals. The key to good practice, compliant with UK and EU legislation, is to have areas fitted with rapid-response online gas monitoring devices integrated into feedback and control systems for the stunning process.

Robust Gas Monitoring Solutions

Edinburgh Sensors have extensive expertise in field-deployable non-dispersive infra-red (NDIR) gas sensors. They have developed a range of real-time gas monitors, with several well-suited to carbon dioxide sensing for livestock stunning and slaughter for meat processing. These include the Guardian and GasCard NG.

Both the Guardian and GasCard NG offer highly accurate, online sensing capability for carbon dioxide with real-time data logging and the possibility to integrate the sensors with alarm features or other gas-monitoring sensors as required. The use of alarms with gas monitors is a key part of UK legislation for gas stunning processes and it is essential that any gas monitors used are extremely accurate, as small deviations in gas concentrations can cause issues with the stunning process and compliance with legislation.

Both sensors are based on the latest patented NDIR technologies with the Guardian NG offering a carbon dioxide detection range of 0 – 3,000 ppm and 0 – 100 % volume. There are a range of GasCard NG options that offer either similar specifications or larger ranges, including 0 – 5000 ppm.

Both devices are designed to be robust and accurate even with challenging, changing environmental conditions. The sensor readout is temperature, pressure, and humidity compensated, capable of ±2% accuracy across the full measurement range, even in 0 – 95 % humidity conditions. The NDIR sensors are designed with ease of use and installation in mind, and only require connection to a reference gas to be up and running.

The Guardian NG comes with its own onboard display and controls, including built-in programmable alarms and the capability for the graphical display of historical readings onboard the device. It boasts a rapid T­90 response time of less than 30 s from the inlet, so even when using complex programmed multistep stunning processes, the sensor can provide near-instantaneous input on changing concentration levels. The sensor enclosure is IP54 rated to prevent dust and environmental protection and ensure a robust and long-lived sensing device.

The GasCard NG is designed for integration into gas sensing systems, coming with two potential communications channels including true RS232 communications or the option of TCP/IP communications protocol. Accuracy of readings benefits from onboard barometric pressure correction in the range 800mbar to 1150mbar and the GasCard NG also has an operating temperature range of 0 – 45ºC compatible with all animal processing conditions.

Both devices come with commercial software solutions for data logging to minimise installation and start-up time and custom solutions in collaboration with Edinburgh Sensors for more complex needs are also possible. Edinburgh Sensor’s products can help you ensure the best welfare for your animals with precise and easy monitoring of carbon dioxide concentrations.

Vaisala wins Finnish Innovation Award with novel biogas measurement instrument

The groundbreaking Vaisala MGP261 biogas instrument has today been announced as a winner in the Finnish Quality Innovation competition, where it won the Circular economy and carbon neutrality innovations category. After being recognised as an outstanding example of innovation in the field of sustainable technologies, the instrument now advances to the finals of the global Quality Innovation Award competition.

“This is a great recognition for a product as revolutionary as the MGP261. The Vaisala CARBOCAP MGP261 Multigas Instrument for Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Humidity was first introduced in early 2019, with instant benefits for the biogas industry. The Vaisala MGP261 transforms waste into value: The better the entire process is monitored and optimised by reacting to changes in gas composition and humidity, the more efficient the biogas plant becomes. This translates directly into improved profitably for customers and is also good for the planet,” says Vaisala Project Manager Otto Tierto.

A sustainable solution for a greener tomorrow

Industrial and municipal waste and wastewater treatment plants, landfills, and even farms can produce electricity and heat from biowaste by using a combined heat and power engine. But running one profitably means improving the quality of the produced biogas; this has been a tough goal to achieve, until now.

The Vaisala MGP261 is the world’s first in situ three-in-one biogas measurement instrument. It works directly in the biogas stream and is Ex certified up to zone 0.

“We all need to do everything we can to halt the climate change by transitioning to a circular economy and turning waste into energy,” says Jutta Hakkarainen, Vaisala’s Industrial Measurements business’ Strategy and Business Development Director. “In a resource-efficient business, raw materials are used in an economical and sustainable manner instead of letting them go to waste. Vaisala’s MGP261 multigas instrument helps the biogas production processes become more efficient and improves the biogas quality.”

ION Science launches new global websites

In a key strategic move to reflect the changing needs of its global customer base, Cambridgeshire-based ION Science – leading manufacturer of gas detection instrumentation for occupational health and environmental monitoring applications – has launched re-designed Global websites at www.ionscience.com.

Duncan Johns, Managing Director at ION Science

Boasting a streamlined, modern design, ION Science’s striking new website offers the ultimate user-friendly experience with improved navigation and functionality while allowing visitors to see the full product portfolio for both its gas and leak detectors and sensors and components.

As well as providing visitors with better access to its advanced range of gas and leak detectors and OEM Gas Sensors, the website offers technical knowledge and expertise in any language, through the comprehensive resource centre containing valuable gas guides, application articles and customer case studies.

The site has a wealth of Customer Support content in document and video formats covering Customer service and technical support, instrument and sensor software, accessories and service and calibration.

Duncan Johns, Managing Director at ION Science comments: “We are excited for people to see our new website. The re-design reflects our on-going growth and continued commitment to the development of high-performance gas detection equipment and OEM gas sensors for use on a worldwide basis.”

Chell embed remote support technology into products for the post-Covid world

With worldwide social distancing and restrictions on travel, gas measurement and control experts Chell Instruments have accelerated the inclusion of remote support capabilities into their products and systems.

The high-precision gas experts have sped up the integration of planned technologies to help them remotely assist customers in the setup, monitoring and diagnostics of new systems.

“As a high-tech sector, we need to find new ways to support clients at a distance. Though it has accelerated development, connectivity was only ever going to be more important and we were well placed to lead our sector with this new technology” says Jamie Shanahan, Chell Instruments’ Sales Director.

To ensure the correct setup, many of the systems Chell provide have traditionally required either the client to visit their ISO-accredited calibration lab or a member of Chell’s technical staff to visit the customer’s site.

The remote support technology has recently been successfully deployed in a gas meter test system for a major manufacturer in Singapore. Instead of a technical representative of the customer visiting Chell’s headquarter to conduct a ‘factory acceptance test’, the checks were conducted in the Singapore factory with Jamie and his colleagues remotely supporting the process.

“We’re very customer-service orientated, so not being able to jump on a train or plane to support a customer is a culture shock. However, we’re actually finding our clients achieve the same peace-of-mind, whilst establishment times are reduced. It’s a win-win in many situations” states Jamie.

Established over 40 years, Chell Instruments has become one of the global leaders in high-precision gas measurement and control equipment. Their systems are employed in aircraft development, Formula 1 and various industries which blend gases with high precision, such as pharmaceuticals and petrochemicals.

Chell Instruments’ products are used across the world where the coronavirus pandemic has meant many countries have imposed travel restriction and asked businesses to restrict physical visitors to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Many of Chell’s products already feature high connectivity to allow the data gathered to be shared and analysed. However, their new remote-support integrations make even more critical information available so that parameters can be affected in real-time from anywhere in the world.